Exchanging dry diversion and poignancy for sitcom beats and nostalgia, this adjustment of Martin Brest’s 1979 film (in light of a short story by Edward Cannon and featuring George Burns, Art Carney and Lee Strasberg) turns a peaceful, character-driven piece into a common gathering of high curse, oldster style. The cast is sure to be a draw as the film clashes against the Smurfs’ most recent wide screen enterprise, however for this situation live activity is no assurance of more measurement.

 

Caine plays since quite a while ago resigned plant laborer Joe, whose tragic rearrange into a huge, unfeeling bank opens the film on a wry note, just to degenerate into a cartoonish trade with a bank officer played by Josh Pais, seriously served in the scene, and with more terrible to come. Joe whiles away his days with previous collaborators Willie (Morgan Freeman) and Al (Alan Arkin) in coffee shops and New York City parks. Until they lose their benefits to corporate moves, the trio make an effort not to weight each other with their inconveniences; in an especially unconvincing subplot, Willie is concealing a desperate restorative condition from everybody.

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